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Sir William Blackstone

November 24th, 2010 by admin

Subject: Sir William Blackstone
Year: 1920
Sculptor: Paul Wayland Bartlett
Location: Federal Triangle
( Constitution Ave. & 3rd )

Sir William Blackstone (1723-1780) was the author of Blackstone’s Commentaries, in which he explored English common law as the basis for English legal decisions (as opposed to traditional Roman law). This remains a basic text for English and American law scholars. The Founding Fathers were familiar with Blackstone’s work and used it as a foundation for the U.S. Constitution.

The statue was intended to be a gift from the American Bar Association to the English Bar Association but, after it was cast, it was found to be too big to fit in the Hall of Courts in London. This casting was donated to the United States government and a smaller copy was made for the English.

DC Goes To The Movies

November 24th, 2010 by admin

Over 200 movies have been made in and around Washington, DC.
This site lists some of those movies and
identifies locations to look for while visiting the Capital City.

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Who Is That Man, Anyway?

November 24th, 2010 by admin

A photographic tour of the statues, monuments, and memorials of Washington DC  including

Northwest DC
Northeast DC
Southwest DC
Southeast DC

As of March 17, 2002, there are 148 statues, monuments, and memorials featured.

Michael Asher: “George Washington” at the Art Institute of Chicago, 1979 and 2005

October 18th, 2010 by admin

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  • ISBN13: 9780764324185
  • Condition: USED – Very Good
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Product Description

In a 1979 exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, American conceptual artist Michael Asher–known for his “site-specific work that investigates the relationship between a piece of art and its place of display–relocated a 20th-century bronze cast of Jean-Antoine Houdons famous marble George Washington (1785-91) from the museums front steps to an interior gallery. In placing the work in a new context, Asher sought to make the viewer aware of usually invisible institutional practices–the categorization of works of art, methods of installation, and the criteria for assigning aesthetic value.
This book focuses on Ashers 2005 installation at the Art Institute, for which he again relocated the statue–but to an entirely different effect. With reproductions of archival documents that chart the itinerant life of the bronze, installation photographs, a selected bibliography, and exhibition history, this book also features absorbing essays that examine the two installations and that offer a unique glimpse into the evolution of Ashers provocative and challenging process.

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Opening Arguments: A Young Lawyer’s First Case: United Statues v. Oliver North

October 18th, 2010 by admin

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Price : Cheap

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  • ISBN13: 9780764324185
  • Condition: USED – Very Good
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Customer Reviews

This book is not interesting., January 3, 2007
By WPSALC
This book is all about the author and the minor position he held in a historic event and little about the historic event. His bias is unmistakable and the book unremarkable and not well written.

He (or his editor) used the incorrect word for a juror challenge on page 211, line 24 (preemptory instead of peremptory), a 1st year law student knows better. If someone will pay shipping I will send the book before I toss it in the trash but it is not worth the time I spent to read it.

hoist on his own petard ?, November 21, 2000
By Orrin C. Judd
Those who are decrying the methods & motives of Ken Starr would do well to read this insider’s account of the IranContra case by the New Yorker’s legal writer.

Among the familiar elements of the story are politically motivated prosecutions (Toobin wanted to join Judge Walsh’s staff because he disagreed with Reagan’s Central America policy), press leaks (by Toobin himself) & relatively minor charges (lying to Congress, obstruction, etc.)

What distinguishes the story of IranContra from Whitewater is the absence of political attacks on the special prosecutor by the White House. In fact, at one point Reagan makes a special appointment of Walsh when North challenges the constitutionality of a special prosecutor appointed by Congressional statute.

These days, in the pages of the New Yorker, Toobin attacks everything from sexual harassment law itself to degradation of privacy rights in his effort to delegitimize the Starr investigation. One wonders if he’s forgotten the personal experiences that he defly portrays here.

GRADE: C+

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Monument Wars: Washington, D.C., the National Mall, and the Transformation of the Memorial Landscape

October 7th, 2010 by admin

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Price : $21.92

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  • ISBN13: 9780520256545
  • Condition: New
  • Notes: BUY WITH CONFIDENCE, Over one million books sold! 98% Positive feedback. Compare our books, prices and service to the competition. 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

Product Description

The National Mall in Washington, D.C., is a great public space, as essential a part of the American landscape as the Grand Canyon, according to architecture critic Paul Goldberger, but few realize how recent, fragile, and contested this achievement is. In Monument Wars, Kirk Savage tells the Mall’s engrossing story–its historic plan, the structures that populate its corridors, and the sea change it reveals regarding national representation. Central to this narrative is a dramatic shift from the nineteenth-century concept of a decentralized landscape, or ground-heroic statues spread out in traffic circles and picturesque parks-to the twentieth-century ideal of space, in which authority is concentrated in an intensified center, and the monument is transformed from an object of reverence to a space of experience. Savage’s lively and intelligent analysis traces the refocusing of the monuments themselves, from that of a single man, often on horseback, to commemorations of common soldiers or citizens; and from monuments that celebrate victory and heroism to memorials honoring victims. An indispensable guide to the National Mall, Monument Wars provides a fresh and fascinating perspective on over two hundred years of American history.

Customer Reviews

Adept History of Washington’s Landscape, July 5, 2010
By Z. Wimmer
Kirk Savage’s “Monument Wars” was a much welcomed surprise to me. I was hesitant to read this book. I was expecting a dry, tedious history of our nation’s capital and its monuments. Nevertheless, I began to read the book and was unable to put it down until I was done. This book is extremely gripping and poignant. Savage took me through the process of how the “Mall” of D.C. transformed from a desolate, barren landscape into an artificial forest and finally into what we see today. Along the way architects, sculptors, and designers had to face harsh out-spoken critics, budgets, and of course red tape.

According to Savage, the process to redefine the landscape was a formidable task and the end result was usually contradictory to the intentions. For example, during the opening ceremony of the Lincoln Memorial the organizers made sure to segregate the audience by forcing blacks in the back.

Furthermore, Savage devotes a solid portion of the book to the history of the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial. His descriptions of these two commemorations were beautifully poetic. I was in awe at how Kirk was able to describe seemingly two simple pieces in such an elegant manner. I must say his depiction of the Grant Memorial and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial were quite moving as well.

I feel confident in saying anything you want to know about the history of D.C. monuments, memorials, and the Mall is in this book. The book is very easy to read and I hope reading it will be as much of a pleasure for you as it was for me.

Moratorium on permanent public monuments in Washington; experimentation with temporary memorials, March 3, 2010
By ROROTOKO
“Monument Wars” is on the ROROTOKO list of cutting-edge intellectual nonfiction. Professor Savage’s book interview ran here as the cover feature on March 3, 2010.

GOod seller, February 11, 2010
By Kyle R. Deremer
The book came quickly and is in very good condition. Good seller to work with.

A highly intelligent and entirely accessible study of the Mall, January 21, 2010
By E. Thomas
Reading “Monument Wars,” has completely altered the way I see and think of the Washington Mall (and memorialization in general). Instead of seeing the Mall as a static and inevitable landscape, I now see the layers of the Mall’s past, shaped by men and politics, and understand what it has lost and what it has gained as it has changed over time. Savage’s prose is lucid and accessible, his arguments are well reasoned and convincing, and his knowledge of Washington impressive. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants a better and deeper understanding of the history and landscape of Washington D.C., the National Mall, and also of the changing ways we think about and perceive them both.

RICK “SHAQ” GOLDSTEIN SAYS: “A TEXT BOOK OF WASHINGTON D.C. MONUMENTS”, December 27, 2009
By Rick Shaq Goldstein
The author Kirk Savage has written a detailed historical book that not only describes the planning and construction of Washington D.C. monuments but also discusses the actual original planning of the city. Any potential reader should be aware that this book is presented (whether the author intended to or not) almost exactly like a high school or college text book. If you’re looking for a breezy reading experience this is not the book for you. That does not mean that there aren’t utterly amazing facts about American monuments that most people wouldn’t even think about… facts such as these are abundant throughout the book… but… you really have to “work” to get them. At times the book seems to be (and may very well have been) geared for architects and engineers… because after all… the author is Professor and Chair of the Department of Art and Architecture at the University of Pittsburgh. Personally, I didn’t know that when I ordered the book. The early going was extremely hard for an average layman reader (non-engineer-non-architect) like me to persevere through the voluminous discussions regarding the Washington Monument. “Spatial terminology”… “visual cues”… “haptic” experience… et al… along with more information regarding obelisk’s than an average person would encounter in a lifetime.

If a layman decides to persevere there are many interesting discussions regarding monuments such as Grant’s Memorial, the World War II Memorial, the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial… and as an honorably discharged Vietnam Veteran… the Vietnam Veterans Memorial was of utmost interest to me. What is also thought provoking is the battle in early America against any monuments at all… when the original beliefs were “THAT WORDS ALWAYS OUTLIVED THE GRANDEST HANDIWORKS OF SCULPTURE AND ARCHITECTURE.” The author also points out how the creation of monuments such as Lincoln’s had to be created with great trepidation so as not to offend the southern confederates… and the monument committees had to tip toe around the fact that Washington and Jefferson were slave owners.

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in 1982 and has “SINCE BECOME THE MOST TALKED-ABOUT, MOST WRITTEN-ABOUT MONUMENT IN AMERICAN HISTORY.” This Memorial was different in that the purpose was intended to be therapeutic. “THE MONUMENT WAS INTENDED TO RALLY AMERICANS AROUND THE SIMPLE IDEA THAT THE VETERANS OF THE WAR NEEDED RECOGNITION AND SUPPORT.” “THE UNIQUE NATURE OF THE WAR… SUBJECTED THE VIETNAM SOLDIER TO UNIMAGINABLE PRESSURES… WHILE EXPERIENCES IN COMBAT AREAS WERE BRUTAL ENOUGH IN THEMSELVES, THEIR ADVERSE EFFECTS WERE MULTIPLIED BY THE MALTREATMENT RECEIVED BY VETERANS UPON THEIR RETURN HOME.” “NEVER BEFORE HAD STATEMENTS LIKE THIS BEEN USED TO JUSTIFY A WAR MEMORIAL.” (*Amen!*)

The second half of this book has a better flow than the first half… but a potential reader needs to decide if they want a book that fits into the usual literary-enjoyable-entertainment-genre… or a text book that is seeded with some tremendous facts.

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